Recent News

Are police making too many stops for minor issues, and could the number of violent confrontations between police and civilians be reduced by reducing the number of confrontations over all? Featured on The New Yorker 
Beckett elected to WSAS
The Washington State Academy of Sciences (WSAS) announced the election of 24 new members in recognition of their outstanding record of scientific achievement and willingness to work on behalf of the Academy in bringing the best available science to bear on issues within the State of Washington.   Katherine Beckett was among the new members to be inducted into the WSAS at their 9th Annual Meeting... Read more
New research debunks the sexist stereotype that women grow bitter and jaded after separating from their husbands. Featured on Salon 
A good measure of how highly a government values “public safety” is the amount spent incarcerating people; a good measure of how little it values people is how much it costs an individual to be impris Featured on The Nation 
Pantazis accepts US Census job
Athena Pantazis accepted a post with the US Census Bureau as a statistician.  She will be working in the Population Division in the International Programs section.  Her work will focus on HIV data and HIV modeling projects. The position begins September 1, 2016.     
Americans often pay for their crimes twice — first with a prison sentence, then with a lifetime of debt many will never be able to escape. Featured on USA Today 
The United States has reinstated a broad system of debtors’ prisons, in effect making it a crime to be poor. Alexes Harris, associate professor of sociology at the UW, is quoted. Featured on New York Times 
Frank Edwards wins 2 ASA awards
Congratulations to Frank!  His recently published ASR paper, "Saving Children, Controlling Families:  Punishment, Redistribution, and Child Protection," (Vol 81, #3, June 2016) was recognized by the ASA Family Section as best Graduate Student paper.  The same paper was the co-winner of the Outstanding Graduate Student Paper award from the Section on Children and Youth.    
"A debtor’s prison of court fines and fees needs to be reformed," writes The Seattle Times Editorial Board. Alexes Harris, associate professor of sociology at the UW, is quoted. Featured on Seattle Times 
UW professor Alexes Harris' new book examines how fines and fees keep people imprisoned long after their sentence is through. Featured on Seattle Weekly 

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